Does Divorcing My Partner Also Mean Divorcing My Business?

Regardless of whether it was six years ago or sixteen years ago, you made a decision. You made the decision to get married to someone. This “special someone” at one point was the light of your life and the light of your world, your other half—or your “better half” or even your “best friend”.

But then it all changed

Suddenly this significant other—your spouse—became a stranger or became working against you rather than with you, or maybe even hurt or betrayed you. Either way, now you face another decision: divorce.

But there’s another problem

Your spouse is also your business partner. So not only are you worried about divorcing the person who you vowed to be with until “death do you part”, you also worried about what is going to happen to your business.

Your business is your baby

We understand. Your business is your baby. You’ve spent years putting crazy amounts of time, money, resources, and energy into building and maintaining it.

So what are your options? Do you lose it all in a divorce?

“Splitting” the Business

In the state of Florida, your business is only in danger if it is considered a “marital asset”. This means that you and your spouse developed the entity as a union. However, if you or your spouse owned the business prior to your marriage, then it likely will not be considered an asset.

On the other hand, if the entity increased in value during the marriage, then the other spouse may be entitled to part of the business’s value. However, this determination will vary on several factors, which can include:

  • The amount of contribution to the business made by each spouse (usually a percentage)
  • Assets
  • Other forms of income
  • Other facets of a marriage – (child-rearing, education, career opportunities, household contributions, etc.)

Many divorced couples continue to remain business partners even long after their marriage has ended. However, in most scenarios, a divorce is a divorce…and the business is often impacted in some form.

This is often because divorce is a stressful and emotional life-changing event, and those emotions often get wrapped up in the business, which can negatively impact the entity.

Contact a Business and Divorce Attorney

However, by working with a business attorney, you can protect your assets, your business, and your future. For more information on how a business and divorce attorney can help you, contact the Campbell Law Group today at 305-328-9506.

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Written by The Campbell Law Group

The Campbell Law Group

Regina Campbell, Esq. is the Managing Partner of The Campbell Law Group based in Coral Gables, Florida. Her prior entrepreneurial experience in building businesses has not only given her the opportunity to develop and hone her business acumen, but has also shaped her background and knowledge to better position the firm to serve and understand all of its client’s needs in an ever-changing global economy.